Photography

Take a closer look

jaguar

Not long ago my buddy Tim did something interesting. Basically, he asked his readers to think about an image – specifically the tasty little automotive morsel you see above – and offer suggestions on how he could use it in a post. It was a good idea. Not only did it give him the opportunity to shake things up a bit and have fun, it also provided a fairly cool way to interact with his readers. 

I offered my two cents with the following ideas::

  • Classic vs new approaches (in sales, marketing, relationships, whatever) and how sometimes tried-and-true is better (or not)
  • Implications of perception
  • What can be conveyed with a single image
  • What new icons are being established right now

A couple of good ideas in there, right? More the fool, me. In his maniacal consistent effort to get me writing on this blog with a bit more frequency, Tim pulled a fast one: “Why don’t you write a post about it?”

Balls.

Over the last week I’ve had multiple false-starts; writing about how we recognize or define beauty to dialing it back and examining fond memories of my first set of wheels. But each time I kept getting pulled back to the image of the car.

But not the Jaguar.

Me, I keep thinking about the beat-up POS peeking out from behind the corner and wondering what the story is there. And as I didn’t even see that humble little auto the first dozen or so times I looked at the picture, I started thinking about just how often that happens.

Meaning, given the massive amount of information we see or hear or read every day, culling that stream into bits or chunks we can deal with absolutely makes sense. And the structure of online data only reinforces that scan/discard process.

I’m not railing against technology here – a clearer example of tilting at windmills I couldn’t imagine – but I do have to wonder: what are we missing?

Photo by PedroSimoes7 

Moving Day

boxes

I had a fairly lengthy couple of opening paragraphs going as a lead-in to this post when it occurred to me a mini novella explaining the virtue of streamlining and simplification might be at cross-purposes.

The short version is this: I have way, way too many bookmarks and folders of “cool shit to read when I get a chance” on my desktop and in my browsers. So, taking a cue from a friend at work, I’m looking to cut loose, clean out, and simplify my digital closets. What follows are a few summaries and links in case you see something you might find interesting…

Doris Egan
I’ve written about her before, but if you haven’t spent some time looking through Ms Egan’s Website you’re missing out. She’s an author and writer for the show House. She’s also a fairly busy woman, and as such doesn’t update very often, but there are some absolute gems if you have a few moments to read.

The first explains why she likes to write about flawed heroes.

“But how much more satisfying to bring your villain right up to the floodlights and have him do his damage; and then to drench him in ambiguity by showing as well that he possesses courage, self-knowledge, and the ability to withstand a bleak existence with grace. It’s that drop of blood in the pearl that gives it its luster.”

That drop of blood in the pearl – wow – what a fantastically lovely phrase. At any rate, the second piece focuses on what it means to be a woman who’s growing older, but I encourage anyone to check it out, no matter what your age. Side note: while the quote below isn’t as sexy as the one above, this was my first kiss with Ms Egan, and the writing that holds me captive :

“The beauty of growing older is that after one has made a fool of oneself enough times, the idea no longer holds quite the same terror.”

50 Banned Books That Everyone Should Read
Fairly straightforward list, but I’m always surprised by some of the titles. 

29 Amazing Long Exposure Pictures
In a word, amazing. Check ’em out.

Photo by Rick